Monthly Archives: January 2017

100 Days

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Disturbed about what to do to survive and resist in the current political climate?
Live the alternative.
Cultivate your agency through daily practice of beauty and expanding your comfort zone.

The following post is by Spelman sister Adinah Morgan, check her out here!

Our 100 Days: A List

100 Days. What can you do with 100 days? This is one of the more popular questions that U.S. presidential candidates have had to answer over the past century. Shortly after the results of the last election I asked myself, “Well, what am I going to do for our first 100 days?” As the list grew, so did the insatiable need to share these ideas with others. I realized that I want everyday citizens, organizations, and people that may even reside in other countries to get involved. The list has grown and expanded to seven different subjects/issues. I have also included additional lists for self-care, and resources for educators who may want to apply the list in the classroom. Together, we can collectively redirect our energy to highlight positive, peaceful methods to counterbalance the anxiety of the past several months. Our 100 Days List is here.

Our 100 Days List is in no way meant to reflect the vast amount of ideas and strategies that have been developed overtime. You may choose from the topics below, or be inspired to make your own 100 days strategy. The mostly free or low-cost tips below are just a place to start.

The ultimate goals of Our 100 Days List are: (1) to help quell the very real fears and anxieties in our communities, (2) encourage more active participation of American citizens beyond 100 days and (3) remind us all of where the real power lies, in ourselves.


Our 100 Days List

Environmental Issues/Climate Change

  • Volunteer at a community garden
  • Teach children how to grow food from seeds
  • Start a recycling initiative in your home or workplace
  • Visit a National Park for an afternoon
  • Learn more about the efforts to protect and sustain clean water in the United States (i.e. Flint, Michigan and Standing Rock, North Dakota).

Immigration

  • Volunteer with a non-profit organization in your area that directly serves refugees and immigrant families
  • Call out xenophobia when you hear/see it
  • If you only speak English, consider learning another language. Practice this new language with multilingual members of your community
  • If you are or know an immigration lawyer, organize a free workshop on rights for U.S. immigrants and their families
  • Host or participate in an international, multicultural gathering with members of your local global community. Offer space for others to celebrate and share their respective cultural heritage.

Islam/Interfaith Outreach

  • Visit a local mosque
  • Spend time reading or listening to the recitation of the Qur’an
  • If you are not a Muslim, be an ally. Call out Islamophobia when you see/hear it
  • Invite Muslim scholars, artists and activists to speak at local institutions
  • If you are a civic or religious leader, invite members of your local mosque to a dinner. Respectfully ask ahead of time what food your guests may be comfortable sharing across the table.

Women’s Rights/Reproductive Justice

  • Research the Divine Feminine.
  • March is Women’s History Month. Host or organize a local event celebrating the women in your community
  • Volunteer for a local women’s advocacy group such as a women’s shelter or a women’s clinic
  • Educate your children about the importance of consent and respecting every body
  • Establish or strengthen gatherings of sacred women’s circles. If you are male or are not able to attend the gatherings, offer space to be of assistance to the women in your life to meet by babysitting, catering or offering other services.

Racial Equality/Black Lives Matter

  • Support black businesses. Open an account at a black owned bank. Invest in black communities and invite others to do the same
  • Host an inter-generational dialogue between elder community leaders and young activists that respect each other and honor the complexities of intersectionality
  • Donate children’s books with positive contemporary subjects to a school that primarily serves children of color
  • Support lawyers and organizations that fight to protect the rights of individuals in prison and illuminate the business of the U.S. prison industrial complex
  • If you are a therapist or counselor of color, consider offering one free group counseling session for members of organizations that work to end systematic racism.

LGBT Rights

  • Host an inclusive house party celebrating all members of the LGBT community and their families in a safe space
  • Support legislation and lawmakers that work to protect and expand LGBT rights
  • Volunteer at a shelter for LGBT youth
  • Advocate to make all restrooms more accessible for transgender people
  • Call out homophobia when you see/hear it. Even if it’s in your most sacred and intimate spaces.

Special Needs/Individuals with Disabilities

  • Speak openly and honestly to people with disabilities in your community. Ask how you can be be more inclusive and respective to their needs
  • Start an initiative for children with learning disabilities to start and complete a creative project
  • If you own a business, consider expanding your workforce to include people with disabilities
  • Teach all children that bullying individuals with disabilities in any setting is unacceptable
  • Respect the space and spaces that are held by people with disabilites. Honor their bodies by asking for permission to touch or interact with them, including the assistive devices that help people operate their daily lives.

Self-Care List

  • Meditate for at least 20 minutes
  • Participate in a free yoga class
  • Walk in nature for at least 30 minutes
  • Wear colors that resonate with you, regardless of the season
  • Make one positive change to your diet
  • Call a friend or loved one who can actively listen to you with compassion. Then check up on someone else, and practice actively listening with compassion.
  • Take a day trip
  • Be creative: write, draw, dance-create for yourself or others
  • Unplug from technology for an hour
  • Rest when needed

Special Resources for Educators:

http://www.tolerance.org

http://www.teachingforchange.org/teaching-blacklivesmatter

http://www.glsen.org/educate/resources/curriculum

http://www.adl.org/education-outreach/

http://www.pbs.org/empires/islam/eduk12plan.html

http://climate.nasa.gov/resources/education/

https://humaneeducation.org/blog/2016/resources-teaching-dakota-access-pipeline-protest/

http://www.specialeducationguide.com/pre-k-12/tools-and-research/support-and-resources-for-parents-and-teachers/

https://www.reproductiverights.org/project/curricular-resources

http://www.racialequityresourceguide.org/guides/guides-and-workshops/&issuefilterType=Education

The more power we use to impact positive change in our communities, the more we will re-evaluate the function and capacity of our government. Please share, distribute, and be inspired.